Category Archives: Hay House

Book Review: The Secret Female Hormone

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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9781401943011The Secret Female Hormone: How Testosterone Replacement Can Change Your Life

by Kathy Maupin, M.D., Brett Newcomb, M.A., L.P.C.
ISBN 978-1-4019-4301-1
Hay House, 2014

Put a room full of menopausal and perimenopausal women together and ask them to raise their hands if they experience any of these symptoms: loss of libido, weight gain, insomnia, fatigue, depression, sore joints, dry eyes, migraines, or loss of stamina. After running through the full list, few women would sit without raised a hand.

Middle-aged women face these symptoms, and a confusing array of scientific evidence about what to do about it. Many women don’t want to mess around with nature, so they choose to ride out the sleepless nights, the fatigue, and the strain on their relationship due to their lack of interest in sex. Many women fear hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of studies that suggested that HRT comes with medical risks. And testosterone? Many women would not even consider adding what they perceive to be a male hormone into their lives. They worry about side effects like facial hair, aggression and a lowered voice pitch.

Kathy Maupin and Brett Newcomb want to open the conversation about the “secret” female hormone. They say:

“Testosterone is not just important to women’s hormonal balance, it is essential.”

Maupin opens the book with her personal experience with Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome (TDS). After suffering the symptoms, and after futile searches in other areas for solutions to the problems, she found relief through bio-medical testosterone pellets. She then used the treatment on her patients and boasts a 95% success rate. Her patients enjoy increased energy, better sleep, loss of fat, improved memory, a re-activated sex drive, balanced mood, and less muscle and joint pain

Maupin and Newcomb don’t suggest that HRT is for everyone. They outline the roles that estrogen, progesterone and testosterone play in women’s lives and the risks and benefits of replacement therapies. They include charts with the symptoms, risks and benefits clearly laid out so readers and place check marks to determine if therapy is something they should consider. But Maupin and Newcomb don’t accept that women these days need to “tough it out” through menopausal and perimenopausal symptoms that are adversely affecting their lives.

“Women still experience the loss of testosterone at the same age they did 50,000 years ago.”

One of the results of our improved health care, sanitation and nutrition is that women’s life spans now extend beyond the time they can reproduce. Women used to die before or not long after they ceased to be able to procreate, so in centuries past women didn’t need testosterone in later life. Now they might. And if a person lives with a long-term testosterone deficiency, serious diseases can result, including chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, heart disease, memory loss, dementia.

This is an American publication, and I am Canadian. I don’t know what the regulations in this country are for testosterone. No matter which country you live in, hormone therapy starts with a conversation with your medical doctor. Maupin and Newcomb wrote this book to arm you with information you can take to your doctor to start that conversation.

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I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

 

Book Review: One Mind by Larry Dossey

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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8348_c1.gifOne Mind: How Our Individual Mind Is Part of a Greater Consciousness and Why It Matters

by Larry Dossey, M.D.
ISBN 9781401943820
Hay House Inc., 2013

Thousands of starlings move as one in breathtaking murmurations. Individual termites work as one colony to construct elaborate nests with complex tunnels and chambers. Queen Elizabeth’s dogs at Sandringham bark like crazy when they “know” she is coming, but while she is still half a mile away, out of sight. These enthralling, fantastic, eerie occurrences pique our curiosities and stretch our minds.

“It’s also the sort of thing that makes skeptics scurry toward ‘coincidence’ with the desperation of drowning men clutching at straws.” —Larry Dossey in One Mind

What’s going on here? How do we live with these real events not yet explained by real science? 

Larry Dossey would have us relax and enjoy them. He quotes Wes Nisker: “Just imagine how good it would feel if we all got together once in a while in large public gatherings and admitted that we don’t know why we are alive, that nobody knows for sure if there’s a higher being who created us, and that nobody really knows what the hell’s going on here.”

His book, One Mind, is written as a series of short vignettes about collective consciousness. The structure means readers can pick up the book, read a short piece, and then put it down to enjoy again later on the next coffee break. He writes about twins who share pain across time and space, near-death experiences, and the specialized, inexplicable skills of savants. He refers to Marc Barasch, founder and CEO of Green World Campaign, who coined the term collaboratory, for “a field of knowing that is greater than that of any group member and greater than the sum of a group’s members.” In a collaboratory: “Solutions to problems surface that we did not anticipate. We become more imaginative, inventive, inspired, productive, resourceful, and innovative”

In the past, scientists tended to shun experiments involving non-physical elements. These days, more and more scientists choose to explore One Mind topics. The entanglement and non-locality uncovered through the study of quantum mechanics pried open some doubtful scientific minds and loaned some legitimacy to One Mind study. When someone like Erwin Schrödinger said, “Mind is by its very nature a singulaire tantum. I should say: the overall number of minds is just one,” other scientists paid attention.

Mounting evidence shows that something is going on, even though we can’t explain it fully—yet. The events Dossey writes about might make us take the Golden Rule more seriously. We must do more than do unto others as you would have them do unto you. He says, “Be kind to others, because in some sense they are you.”

“To become whole all parts must be left behind, for a whole is not the sum of its parts but a different state entirely.” —Joseph Chilton Pearce, cited in One Mind

I don’t know which audience for this book is more important: People who see themselves as part of One Mind, or those who dismiss it as hogwash. Those who see their individual mind is part of a greater consciousness can find reassurance in the many stories Dossey shares of One Mind events. Those who doubt it might learn to relax a little and settle into the wonder of it all.

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I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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Just for fun, relax and enjoy a murmuration of starlings here:

Book Review: Second Firsts by Christina Rasmussen

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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9181_c1.gifSecond Firsts

by Christina Rasmussen
ISBN 978-1-4019-4083-6
Hay House, Inc., 2013

Over the past five years or so, several people close to me lost spouses due to death or divorce. From my position at one degree of separation, I watched them discover their individual paths to “second firsts.” Each person took a different route and a different amount of time, but all their paths shared similar obstacles and milestones.

“Grief walked into your heart and created room for your soul to grow.” Christina Rasmussen in Second Firsts

I recognized these same obstacles and milestones in Christina Rasmussen’s experience of loss and her recommendations for recovery. In her mid-30s, Rasmussen lost her husband to colon cancer. Much of the book content related back to her own personal experiences with grief and life rebuilding, so her stories will resonate with anyone recovering from a disrupted relationship.

Anyone starting over after any kind of life change will find her book helpful though, because her themes resonated with me in other ways, too. I experienced the same fear, frustration and exhilaration when I left my career behind to become a stay-at-home mother. That was a “second first” for me. And I realized that a reluctance to let go is brewing inside me now as my children grow and lead more independent lives: when my home becomes an “empty nest,” I will create yet another new life—a “third first.”

“Launching a new life is a strategic, active process. It doesn’t happen by accident. . . . If they are operating in the default mode of the old self, they will continue to experience the pain of resistance. This pain should not be mistaken for grief. It’s like trying to put on clothes you used to wear comfortably, which no longer fit you.” —Christina Rasmussen in Second Firsts

Most people are familiar with the Elisabeth Kübler-Ross book On Death and Dying and her theory of the five stages of grief. Rasmussen’s book builds on that theory, offering a how-to guide on re-creating life even as people walk through the five phases of grief. She breaks it down into five “Life Reentry Stages”: Get Real, Plug In, Shift, Discover, and Reenter Life. Her five stages encourage mindful reflection of emotions and circumstances and step-by-step “plugging in” to new activities. Gentle but persistent progress ensures that mourners don’t get stuck in the “Waiting Room” of grief, immobilized by fear and a reluctance to let go of no-longer-appropriate “clothing.”

“It’s important not to resist grieving. But distinguish between true mourning and the repetition of loss. Repetition of loss is a natural, albeit ultimately unhealthy, practice of going over the whys , the hows, and the if onlys of your past long after a loss has occurred.” Christina Rasmussen in Second Firsts

From my position at one degree of separation from profound loss, I found this book comfortable reading. I think those with a recent, raw experience of grief would find it difficult to face immediately. They might need to set the book aside for a time until they are ready to start the first Life Reentry Stage. But if you need to re-create a new life, for whatever reason, this book provides encouragement and guidance. If you know someone stuck in the “Waiting Room,” maybe this book will nudge them to begin their second first life.

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I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

Book Review: Money: A Love Story by Kate Northrup

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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8322_c1.gifMoney: A Love Story

by Kate Northrup
ISBN 978-1-4019-4176-5
Hay House, Inc, 2013

Does a trip to a financial planner sound less appealing to you than a root canal? Is money the cause of most of your relationship conflicts? Does your stomach clench when bills arrive? If so, this book will help.

What has love got to do with money? Everything, according to Kate Northrup. She wrote a book about money that’s not about money—not really. It’s about figuring out the emotions money generates in us. It’s about managing our money “energy” in positive ways. It’s about clearing out negative perceptions we hold so we learn to love money, ourselves, and ourselves with money. In other words, if we manage our money emotions and energy in loving, positive ways, the dollars follow.

Northrup dispels many money myths, like the “I can’t afford that” myth. (“If you really wanted it you would figure out a way to get it. If it were VALUABLE to you, you would make it happen. So it’s not that you can’t afford it. It’s just that you don’t value it enough to do what it would take to get it.“), and the “I have to be indispensable in my workplace” myth. (“. . . if you’re indispensable, you’re stuck.“)

To get the most value out of the book, it’s best to complete the journal exercises Northrup proposes. They dredge up lots of interesting things you never noticed about yourself or your family, and they shift your perspective toward a healthy financial direction. She assumes, probably correctly, that most of us have debt to reduce. She puts us at ease with our situation. “. . . if you have debt, you’ve received value and you’ve not given the equivalent value back to that particular party in exchange yet. That’s all it means. it doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. It doesn’t mean you’re a screw-up. You’re not hopeless. You’re not a mess. You’ve simply have some more value to give.” She motivates us, so we actually feel excited to nibble away at that debt.

This book is written for a female audience. Men could benefit from it, too, but Northrup targets women. Maybe it’s because we tend to freak out about money, or (still) look to others to take care of us, or sacrifice our own needs for others. Northrup wants women to find their own power in money. The more we learn about it, the more control we have over the direction of our lives and the better equipped we are to take care of those needs of others. She writes: “When we sacrifice our own well-being in the hopes that our sacrifice will help someone else, we just get two people who are living sub-optimal lives.” It is putting the money “oxygen mask” on ourselves first, so we can breathe to handle what life throws at us.

I feel like a different person after reading this book. I look at myself and money through a new lens, and it feels good.

“The biggest gift you can give someone is your positive, loving attention. So why not give that gift to your money?

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I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

Book Review: The Honeymoon Effect

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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7935_c1.gifBook Review: The Honeymoon Effect: The Science of Creating Heaven on Earth

by Bruce Lipton
ISBN 978-1-4019-2386-0
Hay House, 2013

“The Honeymoon Effect: A state of bliss, passion, energy and health resulting from a huge love. Your life is so beautiful that you can’t wait to get up to start a new day and thank the Universe that you are alive.” —from The Honeymoon Effect

We have all experienced the euphoric honeymoon feeling. It engulfs us when we find new love or achieve a long sought-after goal. Energized and floating on air, we smile broadly or raise our arms high in the air. The feeling doesn’t last long though. Relationships fall into comfortable patterns, or fall apart. The thrill of victory fades into a cherished memory.

Can the feeling last? Can we re-create it? Is there such a thing as “happily every after”?

Dr. Bruce Lipton thinks so. He lays out a scientific theory of happiness creation, including the chemistry and the quantum mechanics behind it. He examines how our vibrational frequencies affect others and how others affect us. He discusses our brain chemicals, including oxytocin, serotonin and dopamine, and he explores the dance between our conscious and subconscious minds.

Lipton proposes that if we optimize vibrational relationships, investigate our subconscious programming to find out how we sabotage ourselves, and stimulate the creation of helpful chemicals in our brains, we can choose to keep the honeymoon going.

Lipton’s theories apply to couples or to the world at large. Since we are all energy vibrations, we all have an ongoing, inseparable vibrational relationship with nature that goes beyond spoken language. “Language was designed to hide feelings.” Vibrations speak louder than words.

“Enlightenment, for a wave in the ocean, is the moment the wave realizes that it is water. —Thich Nhat Hanh

Lipton’s subject matter is interesting, and his writing style makes complex scientific concepts accessible. An epilogue with submissions written by him and his wife could be perceived as syrupy by some—he admits as much. He doesn’t promise perfection, and this book alone does not supply all the answers. This book gives readers a foundation on which to build and provides a signpost to other resources. Most of us don’t have the tools or skills to delve into our subconscious programming and come out with any concrete or useful insights. We need help, and Lipton does point to next-step options.

Will you come away from this book with unending happiness in hand? Probably not. But it’s a start.

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