Book Review: Money: A Love Story by Kate Northrup

I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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8322_c1.gifMoney: A Love Story

by Kate Northrup
ISBN 978-1-4019-4176-5
Hay House, Inc, 2013

Does a trip to a financial planner sound less appealing to you than a root canal? Is money the cause of most of your relationship conflicts? Does your stomach clench when bills arrive? If so, this book will help.

What has love got to do with money? Everything, according to Kate Northrup. She wrote a book about money that’s not about money—not really. It’s about figuring out the emotions money generates in us. It’s about managing our money “energy” in positive ways. It’s about clearing out negative perceptions we hold so we learn to love money, ourselves, and ourselves with money. In other words, if we manage our money emotions and energy in loving, positive ways, the dollars follow.

Northrup dispels many money myths, like the “I can’t afford that” myth. (“If you really wanted it you would figure out a way to get it. If it were VALUABLE to you, you would make it happen. So it’s not that you can’t afford it. It’s just that you don’t value it enough to do what it would take to get it.“), and the “I have to be indispensable in my workplace” myth. (“. . . if you’re indispensable, you’re stuck.“)

To get the most value out of the book, it’s best to complete the journal exercises Northrup proposes. They dredge up lots of interesting things you never noticed about yourself or your family, and they shift your perspective toward a healthy financial direction. She assumes, probably correctly, that most of us have debt to reduce. She puts us at ease with our situation. “. . . if you have debt, you’ve received value and you’ve not given the equivalent value back to that particular party in exchange yet. That’s all it means. it doesn’t mean you’re a bad person. It doesn’t mean you’re a screw-up. You’re not hopeless. You’re not a mess. You’ve simply have some more value to give.” She motivates us, so we actually feel excited to nibble away at that debt.

This book is written for a female audience. Men could benefit from it, too, but Northrup targets women. Maybe it’s because we tend to freak out about money, or (still) look to others to take care of us, or sacrifice our own needs for others. Northrup wants women to find their own power in money. The more we learn about it, the more control we have over the direction of our lives and the better equipped we are to take care of those needs of others. She writes: “When we sacrifice our own well-being in the hopes that our sacrifice will help someone else, we just get two people who are living sub-optimal lives.” It is putting the money “oxygen mask” on ourselves first, so we can breathe to handle what life throws at us.

I feel like a different person after reading this book. I look at myself and money through a new lens, and it feels good.

“The biggest gift you can give someone is your positive, loving attention. So why not give that gift to your money?

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I was not financially compensated for this post. I received the book from Hay House for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are completely my own based on my experience.

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About Arlene Somerton Smith

Writer, laughing thinker, miner of inspirational insights, sports fan, and community volunteer

Posted on September 18, 2013, in Book reviews, Books provided by publishers, Hay House, Non-fiction, Self-Help and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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